Emergency Planning

Latest Posts

Disaster planning when living with disabilities

Wheelchair sign on a concrete wall

For people living with disabilities, preparing for disasters will need to take into account personal needs, such as mobility before, during and after a disaster – especially if there’s no power.

Here are some tips for disaster planning when living with disabilities.

Wheelchair sign on a concrete wall

Be FAST: How to recognize the signs of a stroke

Ambulance speeding through city street with blur effect

When someone experiences a health emergency in front of you, it can be overwhelming. So many questions suddenly flash through your mind. Time is of the essence in the case of a stroke, so it is very important to stay calm and spring into action fast.

Ambulance speeding through city street with blur effect

Warmth and help after an apartment fire in Saskatoon

It was late February 2019, in Saskatoon. The night was freezing, and Samantha was standing outside in her shorts. She left behind her phone charger, her medication, and the wheelchair she uses to aid in mobility issues stemming from chronic arthritis. Samantha left it all behind because the fire alarm was blaring, and thick smoke was filling the hallways of her apartment building.
 

Being ready for fall storms and tornadoes

woman in a black raincoat with red cross logo on it, looks over fallen trees and powerlines.

In September 2018, tornadoes touched down in the Ottawa-Gatineau area, damaging homes and leaving thousands without power in the days that followed. This event is a good reminder that while we can’t control the weather, we can at least prepare for it.
 

woman in a black raincoat with red cross logo on it, looks over fallen trees and powerlines.

Debbie James – A Red Cross Volunteer Making a Difference

The James family were one of many households in Ottawa impacted by the Great Ice Storm of 1998.  They managed through the many chilly nights without power but realized they could have been more prepared. Debbie made the decision, when the time was right, to join the Canadian Red Cross. When learning how to be better prepared for disasters, she also trained to be a responder to help others. 
On September 21, 2018, when tornadoes tore through the Ottawa/Gatineau region, Debbie had volunteered with the Red Cross for 13 years. In that time, she had responded to over 100 individual emergencies and supported Canadians impacted by  large-scale disasters like the Alberta Floods and Fort McMurray Fires. 
 

A fishing trip gone wrong and how lifejackets saved everyone

Jim and his wife always remind their friends how important it is to wear their lifejackets when they go out on the water.

A few years ago, they were out fishing in a Saskatchewan provincial park with another couple. Jim remembers asking his wife if she had caught a fish. That’s when he noticed that she appeared to be dozing off.
 

An unexpected ending to a family kayaking trip

Swimming back to shore wasn’t exactly how the kayaking day trip was supposed to end. It was a warm, sunny day in July when Serge, his wife Carole and their youngest son, Xavier, decided to head out in their sea kayak to explore Skull Island, not too far from their cottage in southeastern New Brunswick. The water is usually relatively calm in the bay and warm, perfect for kayaking.
 

Personalizing your emergency kit

We all have unique needs, so it makes sense that your emergency kit will also be unique. Read how Red Crosser Mahmood Jafari makes sure his emergency plan includes plans for his mobility during emergencies and disasters, and how those with impaired mobility can be ready. 

Subscribe for safety tips, stories from the field, and information on how to get involved with the Canadian Red Cross.

The Canadian Red Cross takes your privacy seriously. We do not distribute or sell your email address to anyone. View our privacy policy.

About The Blog

The purpose of this blog, quite simply, is to talk. This blog is an opportunity for Red Cross staff, volunteers, supporters and friends to share stories about what is happening in your community and the important work you are doing. It is a tool that will help keep all of us connected.

Blog Archives