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5 tips for safe driving this winter

No matter where you live in Canada, winter driving presents its own challenges from slippery roads, to white out storms, to freezing rain and mucky thaws. The good news is taking time to be prepared can make all the difference this season. Here are some tips for safe winter driving.

Having a spooky but safe Halloween this year

In case you didn’t know, Halloween is a big deal, especially when you are four years old.
My son is at that age where you have more costume ideas than time. Or resources. Or your parent’s money.
 
While I navigate negotiating costume expectations vs reality; my wife and I also have to ensure we have a Halloween outing that is fun; (hopefully) memorable; and safe.
 
When it comes to safety and Halloween, some things are obvious but we often miss other aspects as we stockpile our candy in September.

My first time encountering winter in 'Winterpeg'

Three years ago, I encountered my first winter in Canada and to this day I still remember the very first snowflake that fell on my hand. It was magical. 

However, my fascination quickly turned into horror as I found myself walking through 20 cm deep snow embraced by the minus 30°C temperature. This is how my home city, Winnipeg, jolted me into the realities of winter. Or as Winnipeggers called it, ‘Winterpeg’.

Being ready for fall storms and tornadoes

Last September, tornadoes touched down in the Ottawa-Gatineau area, damaging homes and leaving thousands without power in the days that followed. This event is a good reminder that while we can’t control the weather, we can at least prepare for it.
 

Prepping for storms and hurricanes with technology

While Hurricane Dorian makes its way up the Atlantic coast after causing devastation in the Bahamas and continuing to impact the United States, many Atlantic Canadians are stocking up on essentials and preparing for a significant storm that could bring flooding as well as power outages to the region. In this digital age, there are many tech tools available to help you prepare and safely weather the storm.

A fishing trip gone wrong and how lifejackets saved everyone

Jim and his wife always remind their friends how important it is to wear their lifejackets when they go out on the water.

A few years ago, they were out fishing in a Saskatchewan provincial park with another couple. Jim remembers asking his wife if she had caught a fish. That’s when he noticed that she appeared to be dozing off.
 

Reading, writing, arithmetic and water safety

When our daughter Ruby was six months old, we enrolled in Red Cross lessons at our local pool. Those first few lessons were tough, with a crying unhappy baby but we stuck with it. Very quickly Ruby started to gain confidence, and with that a love of the water. She is so proud of every level she completes and looks forward to spending time at the pool each week. This past winter Ruby started synchronized swimming, and those Red Cross swimming lessons helped her pick up the choreography and strokes more quickly.  Those basic swimming skills are the foundation of all water activities like diving, snorkelling, paddle boarding, skim boarding and more. 
 

An unexpected ending to a family kayaking trip

Swimming back to shore wasn’t exactly how the kayaking day trip was supposed to end. It was a warm, sunny day in July when Serge, his wife Carole and their youngest son, Xavier, decided to head out in their sea kayak to explore Skull Island, not too far from their cottage in southeastern New Brunswick. The water is usually relatively calm in the bay and warm, perfect for kayaking.
 

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The purpose of this blog, quite simply, is to talk. This blog is an opportunity for Red Cross staff, volunteers, supporters and friends to share stories about what is happening in your community and the important work you are doing. It is a tool that will help keep all of us connected.

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