Emergency Preparedness (Page 2)

Read blog posts from the Canadian Red Cross to learn more about emergency and disaster preparedness

Latest Posts

The Canadian Thaw: getting ready for spring after winter

The sun is getting stronger, winter gear is slowly diminishing, blossoms are beginning to show, hope is starting to grow – it’s springtime! In Canada, there are a few things to keep in mind to be ready for specific emergencies the new season can bring, such as increased risk of flooding as snow melts away.

Tips for preventing and surviving a home fire

Home fires can happen anytime and anywhere but are most likely to occur during winter in Canada. According to the Commissariat aux incendies de la Ville de Québec, 4 in 10 fatal home fires occur between 10 p.m. and 7 a.m., when the household is asleep.

If the storm of the century hit tomorrow, would you be ready?

Fifty years ago, on March 4, 1971, part of Quebec was paralyzed by the ‘storm of the century’. Although several other powerful storms occurred in the 20th century, including the very memorable 1998 ice storm, the 1971 storm took the title due to a particularly intense mix of harsh conditions. Here are other historic snowstorms from across the country.

10 tips to improve your winter driving skills

There are two extremes in our own perceptions of our winter driving capabilities: there are those who it barely phases, moving deftly from summer to winter driving with nary a care other than switching to winter tires OR those who are gripped with panic, frozen in fear if you will, at the idea of driving on slippery, icy roads that no longer have discernable markings making you dependent on the car ahead of you for as long as you can see it.
Where do you fall on the spectrum?

How to prevent kitchen fires: cooking at home during COVID-19

A woman looking shocked at burned food in a frying pan

Being stuck at home has us all trying random new things. There was the sudden obsession with home-made sourdough bread that swept the internet earlier this year, and a lot of people have turned to perfecting a craft. I don’t particularly enjoy being in the kitchen, so my lockdown saw me learning to play the ukulele.

A woman looking shocked at burned food in a frying pan

Deck the halls with fire safety

A baby sitting next to an artificial Christmas tree, touching one of the bulbs

Keep the season merry and bright with these simple holiday fire safety tips. The fire danger associated with real and artificial trees can be mitigated through these few safety tips

A baby sitting next to an artificial Christmas tree, touching one of the bulbs

How to brighten up a dinner in the dark

I live out in the country where power outages are a regular occurrence, especially during the winter. We’ve gone a few days without electricity in the past, and we’ve had to improvise several hot and no-cook meals. Here are some tips for throwing together a safe candlelight dinner.

What you need to know about carbon monoxide

Every year, hundreds of Canadians are affected by carbon monoxide poisoning. The results can be fatal.
Carbon monoxide (CO) is an odourless, colourless, and tasteless gas, and therefore not detectable by any of the body’s senses. Because of its indiscernible nature, carbon monoxide poisoning is sometimes known as a “silent killer”. CO poisoning happens when someone breathes in too much carbon monoxide.
 

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About The Blog

The purpose of this blog, quite simply, is to talk. This blog is an opportunity for Red Cross staff, volunteers, supporters and friends to share stories about what is happening in your community and the important work you are doing. It is a tool that will help keep all of us connected.

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