Facts on Violence in Youth Relationships

Effects of youth dating violence

Adolescents who experience dating violence are not only at an increased risk of being physically injured, but are also more likely to report binge drinking, suicide attempts, physical fighting, and sexual activity. 1

Both girls and boys who bully in elementary school are at high risk for being physically aggressive with their boyfriends or girlfriends in high school.2

Rates of violence in youth dating relationships

About 1 in 11 teens report having experienced physical dating violence each year in the U.S.3

62 per cent of youth in a U.S. study knew friends and peers who had been verbally abused by a boyfriend or girlfriend, and 20 per cent of 13 and 14-year-olds in relationships knew friends and peers who had been physically assaulted (kicked, hit, slapped or punched) by a boyfriend or girlfriend.4

Trends in violence in youth dating relationships

Sexual assault and related offences such as sexual interference were the most common offences related to dating violence reported to police by adolescents in Canada. Other common offences committed included common assault (27 per cent) and uttering threats (12 per cent).5

More than 8 in 10 victims of violence in dating relationships reported to police in Canada were female.6

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1 Centers for Disease Control, 2006.

2 Pepler, D., Jiang, D., Connolly, J., & Craig, W., 2008, The links between bullying and dating aggression: A joint trajectory analysis.

3 Lynberg, M.C., Eaton, D. et al., 2006, in Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report.

4 The National Teen Dating Abuse Helpline, 2008, July, Tween and teen dating violence and abuse study, commissioned by Liz Claiborne Inc. and loveisrespect.org.

5 Mahoney, T., 2008, Police-reported dating violence in Canada

6 Mahoney, T., 2008, Police-reported dating violence in Canada.

 


  • Facts on Violence in Youth Relationships