Emergency (Page 5)

Read blog posts from the Canadian Red Cross about emergencies and disasters at home and abroad

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It’s okay for adults to cry too: A family's nightmarish New Year’s Eve

On December 31, Geneviève Gauvin was curling her six-year-old daughter’s hair for New Year’s Eve when she heard someone knock on the door, shouting for her to get out. The building was on fire!

Photos: Philippine Red Cross responds after Tropical Storm Tembin

​Tropical Storm Tembin made landfall in Mindanao, in southern Philippines, last weekend, causing flashfloods and landslides and impacting up to 23 provinces and leaving thousands displaced. The storm caused damage to homes, as well as critical infrastructure such as roads, bridges and power lines. Casualties and injuries, as well as missing people, have also been reported.

Rebuilding resilience in Canada and around the world

“The stress and anguish (people) go through, especially right after a disaster, and the emotional toll it takes to recover or deal with the situation – it affects everyone,” says Angelo Leo.  The Canadian Red Cross humanitarian from Vancouver has helped people impacted by disasters and emergencies as far away as Nepal, Bangladesh, and the Philippines. But this summer, he volunteered to help much closer to home. Leo is part of the Red Cross Safety and Well-being team and he went to Williams Lake to help people work through the trauma left behind by the massive wildfires that swept across much of British Columbia.

Health teams work to fight measles outbreak in makeshift camps in Bangladesh

Inside the isolation tents at the Red Cross Red Crescent field hospital in Bangladesh, the air is still. Six kids fight measles, although at some points over the past weeks nearly all 20 beds have been filled at once. Little lungs work to fill as respiratory tract infections are the hallmark of this disease.

The Halifax Explosion: birth of Canadian Red Cross disaster response

In 1917, Halifax, Nova Scotia, was a bustling port and major hub for Canada's First World War effort. Its deep and ice-free harbour is closer to Europe than most on the Atlantic coast of North America and tens of thousands of Canadian, other British Empire and American troops and a steady stream of ships loaded with wartime supplies passed through Halifax to or from Europe.
 
On December 6, the deadliest disaster in Canadian history occurred.

One in almost a million

It’s been three months since waves of people started arriving in Bangladesh by the thousands. Now, at least 621,000 people have fled violence in Myanmar since August 25, joining more than 300,000 who left earlier. That’s almost one million people. But nine-year-old Nur Kiyas doesn’t want to be just one in million.

Saving lives in the dark

It’s hard enough to help people when you clearly see the pain, exhaustion or panic on their faces. But when thousands file past in the dark, as they arrive from Myanmar at the Bangladesh transit centre - stumbling, moaning or just staring blankly - all a small team of Canadian doctors and nurses could do was try their best.

Rainbow marks powerful moment at a camp in Bangladesh

Sandra Damota, a Canadian psychosocial worker currently in Bangladesh, shares some of her experiences working as a member of an international Red Cross team helping thousands living in camps in Bangladesh after fleeing their homes due to violence in Myanmar.

"That [photo] was actually a really powerful moment as we prepared to support the Canadian mobile health team with the arrival of about 2,500 refugees into the transit camp from the border."

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About The Blog

The purpose of this blog, quite simply, is to talk. This blog is an opportunity for Red Cross staff, volunteers, supporters and friends to share stories about what is happening in your community and the important work you are doing. It is a tool that will help keep all of us connected.

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