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Trading in my white coat for a red vest

When people think of hospitals, they think of doctors and nurses. They don’t always think of scientists in lab coats. But we are always there, hidden in the background, providing those doctors and nurses with critical patient information to guide their diagnosis and treatment decisions. Even in a field hospital in Bangladesh. 

Health teams work to fight measles outbreak in makeshift camps in Bangladesh

Inside the isolation tents at the Red Cross Red Crescent field hospital in Bangladesh, the air is still. Six kids fight measles, although at some points over the past weeks nearly all 20 beds have been filled at once. Little lungs work to fill as respiratory tract infections are the hallmark of this disease.

Women aid workers talk about why they do what they do

Recently, I had the chance to chat with four women aid workers, who have been on a combined 35 missions for the Red Cross. They talked about why they do this kind of work, what keeps them driven, and what it is like being a woman in the field. 

One in almost a million

It’s been three months since waves of people started arriving in Bangladesh by the thousands. Now, at least 621,000 people have fled violence in Myanmar since August 25, joining more than 300,000 who left earlier. That’s almost one million people. But nine-year-old Nur Kiyas doesn’t want to be just one in million.

Saving lives in the dark

It’s hard enough to help people when you clearly see the pain, exhaustion or panic on their faces. But when thousands file past in the dark, as they arrive from Myanmar at the Bangladesh transit centre - stumbling, moaning or just staring blankly - all a small team of Canadian doctors and nurses could do was try their best.

Rainbow marks powerful moment at a camp in Bangladesh

Sandra Damota, a Canadian psychosocial worker currently in Bangladesh, shares some of her experiences working as a member of an international Red Cross team helping thousands living in camps in Bangladesh after fleeing their homes due to violence in Myanmar.

"That [photo] was actually a really powerful moment as we prepared to support the Canadian mobile health team with the arrival of about 2,500 refugees into the transit camp from the border."

Responding to the needs of a fleeing population in Bangladesh

Imagine having to escape violence in your home country. You pick up what you can, but you need to leave right now, what would you take? There are thousands of others doing the same. The violence may be right at your door, you may become separated from family and friends in the chaos. Now you need to travel to another country and find shelter there. ​Since October 2016, this has been the reality for hundreds of thousands of people who have fled violence in Rakhine State, Myanmar into Bangladesh.

Myanmar crisis: Red Cross workers share firsthand experiences

A child’s terrible drawing of violence in Myanmar. People in crowded Bangladesh camps gently welcoming those who want to help them. Eager volunteers from the Bangladesh Red Crescent Society also pitching in with much-needed assistance. Just days after arriving, these are a few early impressions from members of the Canadian Red Cross mobile medical team and their Mexican Red Cross colleagues.

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The purpose of this blog, quite simply, is to talk. This blog is an opportunity for Red Cross staff, volunteers, supporters and friends to share stories about what is happening in your community and the important work you are doing. It is a tool that will help keep all of us connected.

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