Recovery Grant Highlights

Topics: Manitoba, Emergencies and Disasters in Canada, Indigenous Communities
Candace Lamb | April 21, 2020

Recovering from a disaster is so much more than rebuilding a house or fixing a road. The Canadian Red Cross works closely with some First Nation communities in Manitoba who have been out of their homes for years due to disasters. Besides ensuring basic support, the Red Cross provides grants to foster a sense of togetherness for those still out of their community and for those returning home. Recovery grants are funded through donations to the Canadian Red Cross.

Recovery Grant Highlights 2019-20
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Arm-wrestling
Peguis First Nation’s arm-wrestling team received a grant to attend the Manitoba provincial arm-wrestling tournament.

Eight-year-old Rosalyn Sutherland won gold for both left and right arm competitions. Rosalyn and 39 of her teammates are now headed for the national arm-wrestling championships.

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Peguis Hockey
Peguis First Nation AAA hockey received a grant which paid for accommodations for their team to attend a AAA hockey tournament and skills camp, which included teams from all over North America. The tournament took place from April 25 to 28, 2019.

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Camping Trip for Little Saskatchewan
With Jordan’s Principle, Little Saskatchewan First Nation received a grant to take several dozen youth to Whiteshell Provincial Park for a few days to learn land-based skills and participate in cultural learnings, recreation, and swimming.

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Quilting Star Blankets
A Red Cross recovery grant enabled Little Saskatchewan First Nation to run a beginner Star Blanket making class where they learned the basics from a community elder.

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Community Garden
The O-Chi-Chak-Ko-Sipi First Nation community school received a grant to build a community garden. The grant money was used to buy supplies to create raised beds, as well as plants, planters, and fencing to keep critters out.

The teacher then used the garden to teach students about healthy eating, canning, and sharing food with their Elders.