Alberta Fire (Page 3)

Filter Posts by Topic

 

Latest Posts

Meet a Red Cross aid worker: Sandra Damota and psychosocial support

Sandra is a psychosocial support aid worker with the Canadian Red Cross. When disasters and emergencies strike, the obvious stuff – damaged homes, destroyed infrastructure, injured people – sometimes makes it easy to overlook the damage that’s invisible. We can be impacted by disaster and emergency in many ways and can experience deep trauma that doesn’t simply go away once physical damage is addressed. Recovering from these events requires emotional care just as much as it requires physical care. 

Tech Talk: Empowering people through electronic cash transfers

It wasn't so long ago that delivering aid in times of crisis, whether in Canada or elsewhere, inevitably took the form of distributing goods (blankets, food, water, and other essentials) and services (shelter, first aid, and so on). But in recent years, the Red Cross has also taken a new approach, one that utilizes the latest technology and empowers people who are affected by emergencies to access cash and purchase items most needed by their family.

Past experiences motivate Red Cross volunteer in Alberta fires response

Mohammed Sunba shares his experiences of volunteering with the Red Cross: he started nearly two years ago to support people who have been impacted by personal disasters, such as house fires and floods. The Alberta fire response is the largest disaster Mohammed has been a part of as a Red Cross volunteer.

Helping a community swim towards recovery

Swim instructors Kaitlin Perry and Breena Rusnell always knew their work went far beyond teaching children how to do the front crawl or how to tread water.  Read how the swim instructors are helping their students and community recover from the devastating Alberta wildfires. 

Using sports to celebrate diversity in Fort McMurray

UNA-Canada’s Sport-in-a-Box program was developed in 2005 with the intention of using sport to combat discrimination and racism. Since then, the program has spread to communities across Canada, including Fort McMurray in February 2016. However, plans to expand Sport-in-a-Box to other youth-serving organizations in Fort McMurray were put on hold after the program lost its materials, and resources on the ground, to the wildfires in May.

Why have an emergency kit? One Fort McMurray resident's story

When the time came to evacuate his Abasand home due to the wildfire, Dan Edwards had only a few moments to grab the essentials - luckily, he was prepared with his emergency kit for a moment just like this. 

Librarian turned Red Cross volunteer helps Fort McMurray residents settle into their new lives

At the Wood Buffalo Regional Library, Librarian Nicole Greville meets with a group of Fort McMurray residents to practice English conversation over coffee and snacks.
 
It’s been more than two months since the ESL group last met and the room is abuzz with conversation. After all, there’s a lot to catch up on.

Nistawoyou Association Friendship Centre and Red Cross partner to assist Indigenous people impacted by fires

The Fort McMurray area is home to almost 90,000 people. Each of them has their own experience and story after May’s wildfires tore through the region. That’s why Red Cross case workers continue to meet with families and individuals to talk through their personal needs and find effective ways to assist. Reaching those people means working alongside community groups like the Nistawoyou Association Friendship Centre. The Canadian Red Cross is partnering with the Centre to help connect with aboriginal residents.

Canadian Red Cross News

Sign up for monthly email updates from redcross.ca.


About The Blog

The purpose of this blog, quite simply, is to talk. This blog is an opportunity for Red Cross staff, volunteers, supporters and friends to share stories about what is happening in your community and the important work you are doing. It is a tool that will help keep all of us connected.

Blog Archives