To mark National Indigenous Peoples Day, we wanted to share some of the ways Red Cross is working in partnership with Indigenous communities across the country, in response to disasters as well as through programs to promote preparedness, safety, and wellbeing.

Meet Guy Day Chief from the Blood Tribe in Alberta. His involvement with Red Cross began as a youth, in school, where he participated in the Red Cross’ Respect Education bullying prevention program. Since then, he’s been working with the Red Cross to assist people impacted by emergencies, like flooding and wildfires.

Guy Day Chief“In my role, being First Nations, when I respond to disasters there is a lot of gratitude from people who have received help from the Red Cross in my community. There may have been a few times when we were in the thick of things and everyone was feeling the stress of evacuations but 99% of the time when the evacuees see Red Cross personnel, especially if it’s a First Nations or Indigenous person working for the Red Cross, waiting there to receive them you can see it in their eyes that they are so much more comfortable.”

June Many Grey Horses is a Red Cross volunteer from Alberta who explains how being impacted by a disaster has helped her better understand the needs of other Indigenous people experiencing a similar situation. 

 

Support in emergencies

In recent weeks, Red Cross has been providing support to thousands of people from northern Manitoba communities evacuated from their homes due to the threat of wildfires. It’s not easy for people to suddenly be displaced from their community and Red Cross has been working closely with community members and leaders, as well as partner organizations, to meet their needs and alleviate stress. Sonya Keeper shares the story of her evacuation from Pauingassi First Nation and how she’s coping away from home.

See more videos highlighting the various ways in which the Canadian Red Cross is working in partnership with Indigenous organizations and communities.