Millions of people are now being impacted by one of the worst droughts Africa has experienced
Millions of people are now being impacted by one of the worst droughts Africa has experienced in decades.
An Ethiopia Red Cross water truck in district of Kindo Koysha, Ethiopia
An Ethiopia Red Cross water truck in district of Kindo Koysha, Ethiopia
Providing water to those in water in the district of Kindo Koysha
Providing water to those in need in the district of Kindo Koysha
With only one truck, communities can only be reached every four days
"With only one truck, communities can only be reached every four days, sometimes longer," says Canadian Red Crosser Kathy Mueller from Ethiopia.
A family of five receives 40 litres. Families say it's enough for drinking but not for cleaning or c
"A family of five receives 40 litres. Families say it's enough for drinking but not for cleaning or cooking,” said Kathy Mueller, who is currently in Ethiopia.
As drought worsens, livestock are becoming weaker
As drought worsens, livestock are becoming weaker; farmers can't sell them because no one wants to buy and the price has fallen at least by half.
Water distribution by the Ethiopia Red Cross in the district of Kindo Koysha.
Water distribution by the Ethiopia Red Cross in the district of Kindo Koysha.

Red Cross efforts continue in response to the ongoing severe drought affecting millions of people in several countries in Africa.
 
These photos depicting water distribution by the Ethiopia Red Cross are provided by Canadian Red Cross communications aid worker Kathy Mueller, who is currently in Ethiopia. In Somalia, Ethiopia and Kenya alone, tens of millions of people are in need of urgent food assistance while the drought threatens to impact many more.
 
“With only one truck, communities can only be reached every four days, sometimes longer. A family of five receives 40 litres. Families say it's enough for drinking but not for cleaning or cooking,” said Kathy. “They also have to share this water with their livestock which, finding no grass to eat, are now nibbling at dried banana plant stalks and dead branches. People say they are waiting for God to give them a miracle.

“As the drought worsens, livestock are becoming weaker, their hip and rib bones becoming more prominent. Farmers can't sell them because no one wants to buy them and the price has fallen at least by half. And they won't slaughter their own livestock, loving them as westerners do their pets.”
 
See how the Red Cross is responding to drought in Ethiopia on the ground level.

Canadians can donate through our Africa Drought fund.